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AVIATION PRINTS .CO.UK

THE ONE STOP AVIATION GALLERY FOR AVIATION ART PRINTS AND PAINTINGS BY LEADING AVIATION ARTISTS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

Aviation prints, the number one aviation website based in the United Kingdom. Our huge stock of aviation art by the world's leading aviation artists Robert Taylor, David Pentland, Ivan Berryman, Anthony Saunders, Simon Smith, Philip West,  Graeme Lothian, Nicholas Trudgian, Frank Wootton, Barry Price, Ronald Wong, Keith Hill, Ray Garner, Michael Rondot, Michael Turner, Geoff Lea, and Tim Fisher, is ready for immediate dispatch. Our range includes aviation art prints of the Royal Air Force, German Air Force, US Air Force and aircraft from other countries.

 

NEW - Aviation Art Postcards

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FEATURED ARTISTS

Ivan Berryman Robert Taylor
Gerald Coulson David Pentland
Nicolas Trudgian Graeme Lothian
Brian Bateman Anthony Saunders

FEATURED SIGNATURE

Mike Scholfield



Click for artwork signed by this pilot

 

 

CLEARANCE AVIATION ART

This Week's Clearance Aviation Art

 Few fighter units in World War II gained the notoriety of Pappy Boyingtons Marine Corps VMF-214 Black Sheep Squadron. Equipped with the Chance Vought F4U Corsair, under Boyingtons spirited leadership, the Black Sheep pilots were accorded one of only two Presidential Unit Citations awarded to Marine Corps squadrons during the war in the Pacific. With the American forces pushing up through the South Pacific, the First Marine Air Wing was urgently looking for a seasoned fighter pilot to form a unit to take the brand new F4U into combat. Boyington had the experience - he had become an Ace flying with Chennaults Flying Tigers in China - and the rank to lead a squadron; he also had a reputation as an aggressive fighter leader, and was a natural choice for the job. Recruiting pilots from the reserve pool, together with others awaiting assignment to squadrons, the 30 year-old Boyington - dubbed Pappy by his group of young pilots - knocked them into one of the most effective fighter units in the South Pacific. In their first twelve weeks of operation they brought down 97 Japanese aircraft, no fewer than 95 of which were enemy fighters. During this period they lost only 11 pilots. VMF-214 saw action at Guadalcanal, the northern Solomons and Vella Lavella; they were the first to strafe Kahili, the first to operate from the field at Munda while it was still under enemy artillery fire, and the first to lead fighter sweeps over Rabaul. Nicolas Trudgians outstanding painting captures the scene at Vella Lavella as Pappy Boyington leads his VMF-214 Black Sheep Squadron off the island strip to escort a B-17 Fortress raid on Rabaul in December 1943. Boyington led his Black Sheep pilots through two combat tours before being brought down himself and taken prisoner. On his last mission he shot down three Zeros, bringing his final tally to 28. He was to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor. Nicks fine image pays tribute to one of the US Marine Corps most illustrious fighter squadrons and to its remarkable leader.

The Black Sheep by Nicolas Trudgian
£100.00
 Nicolas Trudgians dramatic painting recreates a scene near Cambrai, Northern France on the morning of March 18, 1918. Aware of a build-up of forces for a massive German offensive, many RFC squadrons attacked the German positions at very low altitude. Responding with as many squadrons as they could muster, including Richthofens JG1 wing, there followed one of the largest dog-fights of the entire First World War. Seen in the foreground are a Fokker Triplane and an Albatros, having winged a Sopwith Camel from 54 Squadron, as another Camel, and a Bristol fighter of 11 Squadron RFC turn to engage the German fighters.

Richthofens Flying Circus by Nicolas Trudgian.
£120.00
The Short Stirling won the distinction as the RAFs first purpose built four engine monoplane bomber. A strong, highly complex design it gained a reputation as a pilots aircraft to fly being agile for a big bomber and demonstrating great character. Well over 2000 Stirlings provided stout service for the RAF in a variety of extremely important roles throughout WW2.
Stirling Service by Philip West.
£65.00
 R-Robert was dramatically retrieved after nearly forty years on the bed of Loch Ness in Scotland. It is being restored at the Brooklands Museum.

The Loch Ness Wellington by Ivan Berryman.
£65.00

When No 49 Squadron Lancasters bombed the S.S. barracks at Berchtesgaden on 25th April 1945, its aircrews completed a campaign that had begun 5 and a half years earlier in September, 1939. From the very beginning, 49 Squadron were in the thick of the action with one of their pilots, Roderick Learoyd, winning Bomber Commands first Victoria Cross. In 1942 it was Lancasters of 49 Squadron that led the epic raid on Schneider armament and locomotive works at Le Creusot. In 1943 they flew the shuttle-bombing raids to Friedrichshafen and Spezia, attacked the heavily defended rocket sites at Peenemunde, and in preparation for D-Day, bombarded the coastal batteries in Normandy and the V-1 sites in the caves by the river Loire, north of Paris. Later in 1944 the squadron notably took part in the raid on German Baltic Fleet, continuing to fly important bombing missions against the Nazi war machine until the final collapse of the Third Reich. So it was fitting that an RAF squadron whose history went right back to 1916, should make the coupe de grace at Berchtesgarden.  Northern Europes short summer nights, with darkness lasting but a few hours, often saw the RAF bomber crews returning to England at dawn, and it is one such scene which is caught up over the river Orwell at Pin Mill, Lancasters of No. 49 Squadron descend low over Suffolk, heading towards their base at Fiskerton. The night raid on Hamburg is almost completed. Spitfires from No. 129 Squadron, based at Hornchurch, having made an early morning attack on German installations in Holland, have picked up the bombers and escorted them home.
Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian.
£145.00
 British infantry are airlifted during major patrols in Northern Ireland during the troubles.  The troops are transported by Army Air Corps Lynx helicopters, with a Chinook dropping equipment in the distance.

24 Air Mobile by John Wynne Hopkins.
£60.00
<b>Ex display prints in near perfect condition. </b>

Lancaster Lift-Off by Gerald Coulson.
£32.00
 When the U.S. Air Forces arrived in Europe in 1942 it was the beginning of a three year aerial campaign, the scale of which had never been seen before, nor since. The 8th, 9th, 12th and 15th Air Forces constituted the mightiest aerial armada in history. With outstanding leadership and sustained courage, they blazed a trail of glory across the skies of war-torn Europe that today is legend.  Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the beginning of the U.S. Air Forces campaign in Europe, the talented aviation artist Nicolas Trudgian has painted a spectacular canvas, bringing to life the men and machines of that epoc-making era, half a century ago.  Set in a dramatic and powerful evening sky, B-17 Fortresses come thundering home after a mid over enemy territory. Joining the formation are a pair of B-24 Liberators which have become separated from their own group, and P-51 fighters fly in close escort for the perilous journey home. Aboard the aircraft, pilots and gunners scan the horizon for enemy fighters. Flight engineers are busy coaxing their ships along, some having to deal with overheating engines, damaged fuel lines, leaking hydraulics and other inflicted damage. Some have injured on board.  Glistening in the strong evening sunlight the lead aircraft fills the canvas. Clearly visible are the pilot and upper turret gunner, and all the fine detail of this legendary warbird as it thunders through the sky. Below, reflecting the evening glow, is the forbidding North Sea, providing a constant reminder that the dangers of the mission are not yet ever.

Thundering Home by Nicolas Trudgian.
£185.00

FEATURED AIRCRAFT

Canberra

The English Electric Canberra first flew on Friday 13 May 1949 when its performance created a sensation. Such was the quality of the original design that in May 1951, when the first B2 Canberras entered service with No 101 Squadron at RAF Binbrook they could out manoeuvre all the fighters of the period and fly with impunity more than 10,000 feet above them. Operated by 17 airforces in more than 20 different variants, Canberras have been to war at Suez and in India, in Vietnam and the Falklands campaign, and in 1996 Canberra PR9s were engaged in operational reconnaissance flights over Bosnia and in other regions. It is widely and justifiably regarded as one of the greatest aircraft designs of all time.

Click for artwork of this aircraft

LATEST AVIATION RELEASES

 Austrian-born Walter Nowotny was one of Germany's highest scoring aces of WWII with 258 victories to his credit, three of them flying the Messerschmitt Me.262. He is depicted here flying White 8 of Kommando Nowotny based at Achmer, Germany in 1944. He was killed in action later that year following a fraught combat with US fighters during the Defence of the Reich.

White 8 - Walter Nowotny by Ivan Berryman.
 The highest scoring fighter pilot of all time with a confirmed tally of 352 victories, Erich Hartmann is depicted getting airborne from a snowy airstrip in Czechoslovakia, late in 1944 in a Bf109G-6 of 6./JG 52.

Erich Hartmann - The Ace of Aces by Ivan Berryman.
 Arguably the best known of all World War 1 fighter aces, Mannfred von Richthofen, the 'Red Baron', is depicted here flying Fokker Dr.1, serial No 425/17, in its final livery following the introduction of the <i>Balkenkreuze</i>, early in 1918. Contrary to popular belief, this was the only Triplane flown by the <i>Rittmeister</i> that was painted all red and was also the aircraft in which he lost his life on 21st April 1918, the celebrated ace having scored a confirmed 80 victories against allied aircraft over France.

The Greatest of Them All - Manfred von Richthofen by Ivan Berryman.
 Perhaps the greatest exponent of Fokker's Eindecker series of aircraft, Max Immelmann is credited with 15 aerial victories and was the first fighter pilot ever to win the coveted Pour le Mérite. He was killed on 18th June 1916 during combat with British FE.2B fighters of 25 Sqn.

The First Ace - Max Immelmann by Ivan Berryman.

This Week's Half Price Offers

 The top scoring ace of JG.51, Anton Hafner is credited with 204 confirmed victories.  A prolific scorer, on 8th August 1944, he shot down no fewer than seven Russian Sturmoviks and, by October of that year, his overall tally had exceeded 200.  He died in combat with a Yak 7, his 204th victim, when his aircraft hit a tree. He is shown here in Messerschmitt Bf.109G-6 442013 <i>Black 1</i>.

Anton Hafner by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 One of 6,176 Halifaxes built during World War II, NA337(2P-X) was shot down over Norway on 23rd April 1945.  In 1995 it was recovered from the lake that had been its watery home for fifty years and has now been restored by the Halifax Aircraft Association in Ontario, Canada.

Halifax Mk.III NA337 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Junkers JU87 R-1 Stukas find a gap in the cloudbase en route to their target during the Norwegian Campaign of 1941.

Dawn Raiders by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 A Focke-Wulf 190 claims another victim, a lone B17 in the skies over the Western front in 1944.

Focke Wulf Supremacy by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £70.00

 The formation of six New Zealand squadrons within the RAF in the early part of WW2 acknowledged the contribution and commitment of the Commonwealth to the campaign against the Nazi invasion of Europe.  Among these was 489 Sqn, based at Dallachy in Scotland, whose Beaufighter Mk Xs flew missions against Axis shipping in the North Sea as well as other missions along the Scandinavian coast.  Here, two 489 Sqn Beaufighters run up their engines prior to a sortie in the Winter of 1943/44.

Kiwis at Dallachy - Tribute to No.489 Squadron by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £50.00
 Portsmouth August 26th 1940, the lone spitfire of Squadron Leader Sandy Johnstone breaks the ranks and picks off one of the menacing Heinkels only to encounter an equally determined attack from a BF109. <br><br>We were brought to readiness in the middle of lunch and scrambled to intercept mixed bag of 100+ Heinkel IIIs and DO 17s approaching Portsmouth from the South.  The controller did a first class job and positioned us one thousand feet above the target. with the sun  behind us, allowing us to spot the raiders from a long way off. No escorting Messchersmitts were in sight at the time, although a sizable force was to turn up soon after. then something strange happened.  I was about to give a ticking off to our chaps for misusing the R/T when I realised I was listening to German voices. It appeared we were both using the same frequency and, although having no knowledge of the language it sounded from the monotonous flow of the conversation that they were unaware of our presence. as soon  as we dived towards the leading formation, however we were assailed immediately to loud shouts of  Achtung Spitfuern Spitfuern! as our bullets began to take their toll.  In spite of having taken jerry by surprise our bag was only six, with others claimed as damaged, before the remainder dived for cloud cover and turned for home. In the meantime the escorting fighters were amongst us when two of our fellows were badly shot up. Hector Maclean stopped a cannon shell on his cockpit, blowing his foot off above the ankle although, in spite of his grave injuries, he managed to fly his spitfire back to Tangmere to land with wheels retracted. Cyril Babbages aircraft was also badly damaged in the action. forcing him to abandon it and take to his parachute. He was ultimately picked up by a rescue launch and put ashore at Bognor, having suffered only minor injuries.  I personally accounted for one Heinkel III in the action (Sandy Johnson) . <br><br>No. 602 City of Glasgow auxiliary squadron was a household name long before WWII began. It had been the first auxiliary squadron to get into the air in 1925, two of its members, Lord Clydeside and David McIntyre  were the first to conquer Mount Everest in 1933: the squadron sweeped the board in gunnery and bombing in 1935, beating the regular squadrons at their own game. It was the first auxiliary Squadron to be equipped with Spitfire Fighters as far back as March 1939 and it was the first squadron to shoot down the first enemy aircraft on British soil.  The squadron moved south from Drem airfield in East Lothian on August 14th 1940 to relieve the already battered no. 145 squadron at Westhampnett, Tangmeres satelitte station in Sussex. The squadron suffered 5 casualties during the battle. The squadron remained at Westhampnett until December 1940 to be replaced by no. 610 auxiliary airforce squadron. No 602 squadron itself remained active up until 1957 when it was put into mothballs.

Gauntlet by Anthony Saunders.
Half Price! - £100.00
 P/O J E Marshall baling out of his stricken 79 Sqn Hurricane on 30th August 1940.

A Hasty Exit by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £75.00
 So versatile was the Mosquito that is performed in every role allotted to the R.A.F. and R.C.A.F. during World War II. Made almost entirely of wood, and powered by two hefty Merlin engines, it was the fastest piston engined aircraft of the war. Seen in its intruder configuration, Mosquitos of 418 Squadron, R.C.A.F. led by Charlie Krause, make a devastating high speed low-level attack on railroad marshalling yards in northern France during the winter of 1944.

Trainbusters by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - £55.00
 

TOP AIRCRAFT

Spitfire

The operational history of the Spitfire with the Royal Air Force started with the first Mark 1 Spitfire K9789, which entered service with 19th Squadron RAF at Duxford Airfield on 4th August 1938. The Spitfire achieved legendary status during the Battle of Britain, a reputation aided by the famous Spitfire Fund organised and run by Lord Beaverbrook at the Ministry of aircraft production. 
Although the key aim of Fighter Command was to stop the Luftwaffes bombers, in practice the tactic was to use Spitfires to counter German escort fighters, particularly the Bf109s, while the Hurricane squadrons attacked the bombers. Well known Spitfire pilots included Johnnie Johnson (34 enemy aircraft shot down), who flew the Spitfire right through his operational career from late 1940 to 1945, John Freeborn, Douglas Bader, Robert Standford-Tuck, Maurice Brown who flew Spitfires and Hurricanes during the major air battles of 1940. Some notable Commonwealth pilots were Canadian George Beurling with 31.33 victories, South African Pilot A G Sailor Malan with 27 victories and Alan Deere from New Zealand with 17 victories. The Spitfire continued to play increasingly diverse roles throughout the Second World War and beyond, often in air forces other than the RAF. The Spitfire, for example, became the first high-speed photo reconnaissance aircraft to be operated by the RAF. Sometimes unarmed, they flew at high, medium and low altitudes, often ranging far into enemy territory to closely observe the Axis powers and provide an almost continual flow of valuable intelligence information throughout the war. In 1941 and 1942, PRU Spitfires provided the first photographs of the Freya and Würzburg systems and, in 1943, helped confirm that the Germans were building the V1 and V2. In the Mediterranean the Spitfire blunted the attacks on Malta by the Italian Regia Aeronautica and German Luftwaffe and, from early 1943, helped pave the way for the Allied invasions of Sicily and Italy. On 7th March 1942, 15 Mk Vs carrying 90-gallon fuel tanks under their bellies took off from HMS Eagle off the coast of Algeria on a 600-mile flight to Malta. Those Spitfires were the first to see service outside Britain. During WWII, Spitfires were used by the USAAF in the 4th Fighter Squadron until replaced by P-47 Thunderbolts in March 1943.
Lancaster Me262 Spitfire Mustang
Hurricane Me109 Flying Fortress Fw190

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AIRCRAFT

Spitfire
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New Aviation Packs
Dambuster Crew Signed Art Prints.
The

The Dambusters by Gerald Coulson.
Dambusters

Dambusters - Moment of Truth by Ivan Berryman. (C)
Save £290!
Jet Age Aviation Art Print Pack.
Victor

Victor by Keith Aspinall.
Testing

Testing Time by Keith Aspinall.
Save £12!
Low Cost RAF Bomber Prints.
Breaking

Breaking the Silence by Keith Aspinall.
Climbing

Climbing Out by Keith Aspinall.
Save £12!
Keith Woodcock Hurricane Art Print Pack.
Dawn

Dawn Scramble by Keith Woodcock.
The

The Last of the Many by Keith Woodcock.
Save £70!
World War One Aviation Dogfight Art Prints.
Knights

Knights of the Sky by Nicolas Trudgian
Captain

Captain Roy Brown engages the Red Baron, 21st April 1918 by Ivan Berryman.
Save £210!

Welcome to Aviation Prints .co.uk!  Use our drop down menus to find a particular aircraft, artist or signature, or click the links to the most popular in each category which we have provided above.  Browse through over 80 aviation artists, 120 different aircraft and well over 1500 aviation pilot and aircrew signatures.  Look out for our specially discounted two-print packs - especially designed for aviation art collectors, our packs bring together prints with the same aircraft, squadron, event or similar collectable signatures and offer large discounts off some of the latest releases and most popular prints.

At Aviation Prints .co.uk we hold 99% of the items advertised on our website in stock - our warehouse contains more stock than any other aviation art dealer, and we have over 1,000 print editions which are unavailable anywhere else.  We invest in aviation art by publishing artwork by a number of aviation artists ourselves - and we are also authorised distributors for other aviation art publishers, making our range of artwork the largest available.  With over 24 years of experience in the field of fine art, you can find the best deals around on aviation art at Aviation Prints .co.uk!

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