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Aviation prints, the number one aviation website based in the United Kingdom. Our huge stock of aviation art by the world's leading aviation artists Robert Taylor, David Pentland, Ivan Berryman, Anthony Saunders, Simon Smith, Philip West,  Graeme Lothian, Nicholas Trudgian, Frank Wootton, Barry Price, Ronald Wong, Keith Hill, Ray Garner, Michael Rondot, Michael Turner, Geoff Lea, and Tim Fisher, is ready for immediate dispatch. Our range includes aviation art prints of the Royal Air Force, German Air Force, US Air Force and aircraft from other countries.


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Ivan Berryman Robert Taylor
Gerald Coulson David Pentland
Nicolas Trudgian Graeme Lothian
Brian Bateman Anthony Saunders


Admiral Sir Michael Layard, KCB, CBE

Admiral Sir Michael Layard, KCB, CBE retired from the Royal Navy in 1995 after some 40 years service – first as a Seaman Officer, then as a Fighter Pilot, flying from the aircraft carriers HMS Eagle and HMS Ark Royal. He commanded the last Sea Vixen Squadron, 899, HMS Lincoln, HMS Cardiff and the Royal Naval Air Station at Culdrose. He was also the last Commander Air in the former HMS Ark Royal. His first job as a Rear Admiral, in 1988, was as the Fleet Air Arm Tribal Chief, FONAC, later to embrace all active Naval Aviation as the FONA. Finally, he was the first combined Second Sea Lord and CinC Naval Home Command, on the Admiralty Board and responsible for all Royal Naval and Royal Marine people policy. He took part in several “bush fire” conflicts in the Middle and Far East during the 60s and 70s. He saw action in the Falklands War, as the Senior Naval Officer in MV Atlantic Conveyor. He was awarded the CBE. Now, in retirement, he is involved in too many things ranging from Charities and Trusts, to School Governorships, the NHS and the Fleet Air Arm Museum. He and his wife, Elspeth have lived in Somerset, on and off, for over 35 years and she is the proud Sponsor who launched the Duke Class Frigate, HMS Somerset. They have two delightful married sons. He says he is a passable painter and a passionate sailor and they are never happier than when they are “collecting experiences” – he did a bungie jump in New Zealand on his sixtieth birthday! His 32-foot yacht ‘Banjo’ is the second most beautiful woman in his life.

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This Week's Clearance Aviation Art

 A swordfish from HMS Warspite on patrol off the coast of Egypt, near the port of Alexandria.

Out of Alex by David Pentland.
British paratroopers board a Dakota in preparation for Operation Market Garden, the assault on Arnhem.

Dawn Departure, Arnhem by Geoff Lea.
 A de Havilland DH.82A Tiger Moth over Hatfield Aerodrome, early in 1939.  Hatfield was the home of the de Havilland Aircraft Company and No.1 Elementary Flying Training School.

First Solo by John Young.
 It required more than a little nerve to fly a fighter into the barrage of fire sprayed out by the gunners of a box of B17 bombers; it took even greater courage to do so in the rocket propelled Me163 Komet.  With rocket science still in its infancy, these small aircraft were still in the experimental stage, and piloting what amounted to a flying bomb was in itself a perilous business, let alone flying them into combat.  But these were desperate times.  The day and night bombing assault on Germany was bringing the mighty war machine to its knees, and aything that might help stem the tide was thrown into battle.  Powered by a mixture of two highly volatile chemicals, the slightest leak, or heavy landing could cause a huge explosion, and the mix was so corrosive that in the event of even a minor accident, the pilot could literally be dissolved.  Sitting in a cramped cockpit, surrounded by dangerous chemicals and ammunition, the intrepid aviator would be launched into the sky on what was, at best, a four minute mission.  After, hopefully, engaing the enemy, he would glide powerlessly back to the nearest airfield to be refuelled so as to attempt the hazardous operation all over again.  Though limited to a handful of victories, the Komet did make the Allied crews wonder what else the Luftwaffe had hidden up its sleeve, and had the distinction of being the forerunner of aircraft technology that eventually took aircraft into space.  Capable of nearly 600mph and climbing to 30,000ft in less than two minutes, this tiny rocket propelled Me163 Komet was typical of Germanys ingenuity in its desperate attempts to stem the havoc being wreaked by the USAAFs daylight bombers.

Rocket Attack by Nicolas Trudgian.

 A Lancaster heads out to its target as the sun sets.

Long Night Ahead by Gerald Coulson.
 Of the many famous combat aircraft to serve their respective countries in the Second World War, two perhaps more than any others, created huge impact and consternation upon seasoned opposing pilots when they first appeared on the battlefront - the Supermarine Spitfire and the Messerschmitt Me262. Both in their day represented enormous advances in aircraft design and power, and both have continued to capture the imagination of aviation enthusiasts ever since. As the war progressed the Spitfire continually upgraded its performance and by the time the Luftwaffes new Me262 turbo-jet arrived on the scene the sleek new Mk XIV, powered by the awesome Griffon engine, was among the fastest piston-engine fighters of the war. The stage was set for a clash between the most powerful piston-engine fighter and the worlds first turbojet, and it was not long before the pilots of these two most advanced combat aircraft met in the hostile skies over western Europe. Ill-advisedly employed by Hitler as the wonder-bomber, the Me262 was initially issued to Bomber Units, one of which being KG51. Tasked with undertaking lightning fast raids upon advancing Allied ground forces, the shark-like jets employed their spectacular speed advantage to surprise, strike and escape. Not to be outdone, the RAF responded with their supremely fast Spitfire XIVs which had already proven themselves highly effective against Germanys V1 flying bombs. In his painting, Nick Trudgian recreates a typical moment: Spitfire Mk XIVs of 41 Squadron have intercepted and damaged a Me262 of KG51 and, with smoke and debris pouring from its damaged Jumo 004 Turbojet, the stricken Luftwaffe jet will be lucky to make it home. A dramatic painting and a fine tribute to the RAFs contribution to the Victory in Europe.

Victory Over the Rhine by Nicolas Trudgian.
 Flt. Lt. Geoffrey Wellum of 92 Squadron once again takes his trusted Spitfire into attack high over southern England. Any moment now both he and one other Spitfire pilot will be flying into hell amongst at least a dozen Luftwaffe He111s on their way to drop their bombs on London. Geoffrey Wellum together with other pilots of Fighter Command became One of the Few and fought with courage and determination.
Tally Ho! by Philip West.
 The legendary, much loved and respected wooden wonder Mosquito was perhaps the best twin-engined fighter-bomber of its size to see combat action during WW11. More than 7,700 de Havilland Mosquitoes were produced and served in many versions, from fighters, night fighters, bombers, attack aircraft, trainers, reconnaissance aircraft, torpedo bombers and civil transports.
Wings of Dawn by Philip West.


Brandenburg D.I

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 Born of Croatian parents in Sarajevo in 1893, Friedrich Navratil served under the Austro Hungarian flag throughout his considerable military career, becoming an outstanding pilot with Flik 3J on the Italian Front. He is depicted here chasing down a Hanriot of 72A Squadriglia da Caccia over Val del Concei in August 1918 to claim his third of ten victories. Navratil's distictive Albatross D.III (Oef) 253.06 was easily identifiable by his personalised 'Pierced Heart' emblem and is unusual in sporting the then new Balkenkeuz cross, untypical of Austro-Hungarian aircraft in WW1.

Oblt Friedrich Navratil by Ivan Berryman.
 Spitfire P9433 DW-E of  No.610 flown by P/O Pegge, in which he shot down two Bf.109Es on 12th August 1940.

Tribute to Pilot Officer Pegge of No.610 Squadron by Ivan Berryman.
 The Gruppenkommandeur of II./JG 54 Erich Rudorffer is depicted in Fw190A-6 'Black Double Chevron' over the misty forests of Finland in June 1944. Credited with 222 aerial victories, he survived being shot down no less than sixteen times and survived the war until eventually passing away in 2016 aged 98.

Erich Rudorffer by Ivan Berryman.
 F/Lt Warner was shot down in combat with Bf 109s on 16th August 1940 at 17:15hrs off Dungeness.  He was flying Spitfire DW-Z (R6802).

Tribute to Flight Lieutenant Warner of No.610 Sqn by Ivan Berryman. (P)

This Week's Half Price Offers

DHM925.  Harrier in a Hyde by Geoff Lea.

Harrier in a Hyde by Geoff Lea.
Half Price! - £30.00
 P-40 Kittyhawks of No.112 Squadron, Medenine, April 1943.  Aircraft GA-V (ground, nearest on right) is Kittyhawk Mk.III, FR440, which was later lost when damaged beyond repair after a belly landing.

Kittyhawks of No.112 Squadron by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
A Royal Air Force Wessex HC2 Helicopter picks up troops somewhere in Northern Ireland.

Pup Northern Ireland by John Wynne Hopkins (P)
Half Price! - £3000.00
 Undoubtedly one of the truly great Aces of the First World War, William Billy Bishop became celebrated for his technique of actively seeking out the enemy and bringing the fight to him, rather than the more usual practice of patrolling in search of enemy activity. An example of this was his single-handed attack on a German airfield in June 1917 when he destroyed not only a number of aircraft on the ground, but then successfully despatched another seven Albatross scouts that took off to engage him. For this action, he was awarded the Victoria Cross in August 1917 and his final tally when the war ended was 72 confirmed victories. He is depicted here in his Nieuport Scout B1566 in combat with a Pfalz D.III.

Captain William Billy Bishop by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £290.00

 Having joined the RAF at the age of 19, James Francis Edwards was to end the war with a total of  20 confirmed kills and another 10 probables and was one of Canada's greatest aces.  He is depicted here in his Curtiss P.40, dispatching a Macchi MC.202 whilst defending Boston and Baltimore bombers on their way to attack the airfields of Daba on 19th October 1942.

Tribute to Wing Commander James 'Stocky' Edwards by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 One of the most versatile British aircraft of the second world war, the Mosquito was employed in many roles during the war, including as seen here, in photo reconnaissance.

Photo Reconnaissance Mosquito by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
The scene depicts an encounter between Manfred Von Richthoffen, leader of the Jasta II squadron and a patrol of Sopwith Camels. This particular battle above France took place only weeks before Richthoffen was killed as can be seen from the Balken Kreuz insignia which replaced the iron cross on German aircraft after a directive dated March 1918.

Manfred Von Richthoffen (The Red Baron) by Tim Fisher (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 An SAS team is picked up by a U.S. Army Special Forces Blackhawk helicopter after a successful operation against the Taliban.

Extraction - Afghanistan 2011 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00



The operational history of the Spitfire with the Royal Air Force started with the first Mark 1 Spitfire K9789, which entered service with 19th Squadron RAF at Duxford Airfield on 4th August 1938. The Spitfire achieved legendary status during the Battle of Britain, a reputation aided by the famous Spitfire Fund organised and run by Lord Beaverbrook at the Ministry of aircraft production. 
Although the key aim of Fighter Command was to stop the Luftwaffes bombers, in practice the tactic was to use Spitfires to counter German escort fighters, particularly the Bf109s, while the Hurricane squadrons attacked the bombers. Well known Spitfire pilots included Johnnie Johnson (34 enemy aircraft shot down), who flew the Spitfire right through his operational career from late 1940 to 1945, John Freeborn, Douglas Bader, Robert Standford-Tuck, Maurice Brown who flew Spitfires and Hurricanes during the major air battles of 1940. Some notable Commonwealth pilots were Canadian George Beurling with 31.33 victories, South African Pilot A G Sailor Malan with 27 victories and Alan Deere from New Zealand with 17 victories. The Spitfire continued to play increasingly diverse roles throughout the Second World War and beyond, often in air forces other than the RAF. The Spitfire, for example, became the first high-speed photo reconnaissance aircraft to be operated by the RAF. Sometimes unarmed, they flew at high, medium and low altitudes, often ranging far into enemy territory to closely observe the Axis powers and provide an almost continual flow of valuable intelligence information throughout the war. In 1941 and 1942, PRU Spitfires provided the first photographs of the Freya and Würzburg systems and, in 1943, helped confirm that the Germans were building the V1 and V2. In the Mediterranean the Spitfire blunted the attacks on Malta by the Italian Regia Aeronautica and German Luftwaffe and, from early 1943, helped pave the way for the Allied invasions of Sicily and Italy. On 7th March 1942, 15 Mk Vs carrying 90-gallon fuel tanks under their bellies took off from HMS Eagle off the coast of Algeria on a 600-mile flight to Malta. Those Spitfires were the first to see service outside Britain. During WWII, Spitfires were used by the USAAF in the 4th Fighter Squadron until replaced by P-47 Thunderbolts in March 1943.
Lancaster Me262 Spitfire Mustang
Hurricane Me109 Flying Fortress Fw190


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Flying Fortress

New Aviation Packs
Dambuster Crew Signed Art Prints.

The Dambusters by Gerald Coulson.

Dambusters - Moment of Truth by Ivan Berryman. (C)
Save £290!
Jet Age Aviation Art Print Pack.

Victor by Keith Aspinall.

Testing Time by Keith Aspinall.
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Low Cost RAF Bomber Prints.

Breaking the Silence by Keith Aspinall.

Climbing Out by Keith Aspinall.
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Keith Woodcock Hurricane Art Print Pack.

Dawn Scramble by Keith Woodcock.

The Last of the Many by Keith Woodcock.
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World War One Aviation Dogfight Art Prints.

Knights of the Sky by Nicolas Trudgian

Captain Roy Brown engages the Red Baron, 21st April 1918 by Ivan Berryman.
Save £210!

Welcome to Aviation Prints .co.uk!  Use our drop down menus to find a particular aircraft, artist or signature, or click the links to the most popular in each category which we have provided above.  Browse through over 80 aviation artists, 120 different aircraft and well over 1500 aviation pilot and aircrew signatures.  Look out for our specially discounted two-print packs - especially designed for aviation art collectors, our packs bring together prints with the same aircraft, squadron, event or similar collectable signatures and offer large discounts off some of the latest releases and most popular prints.

At Aviation Prints .co.uk we hold 99% of the items advertised on our website in stock - our warehouse contains more stock than any other aviation art dealer, and we have over 1,000 print editions which are unavailable anywhere else.  We invest in aviation art by publishing artwork by a number of aviation artists ourselves - and we are also authorised distributors for other aviation art publishers, making our range of artwork the largest available.  With over 24 years of experience in the field of fine art, you can find the best deals around on aviation art at Aviation Prints .co.uk!

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