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AVIATION PRINTS .CO.UK

THE ONE STOP AVIATION GALLERY FOR AVIATION ART PRINTS AND PAINTINGS BY LEADING AVIATION ARTISTS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

Aviation prints, the number one aviation website based in the United Kingdom. Our huge stock of aviation art by the world's leading aviation artists Robert Taylor, David Pentland, Ivan Berryman, Anthony Saunders, Simon Smith, Philip West,  Graeme Lothian, Nicholas Trudgian, Frank Wootton, Barry Price, Ronald Wong, Keith Hill, Ray Garner, Michael Rondot, Michael Turner, Geoff Lea, and Tim Fisher, is ready for immediate dispatch. Our range includes aviation art prints of the Royal Air Force, German Air Force, US Air Force and aircraft from other countries.

 

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FEATURED ARTISTS

Ivan Berryman Robert Taylor
Gerald Coulson David Pentland
Nicolas Trudgian Graeme Lothian
Brian Bateman Anthony Saunders

FEATURED SIGNATURE

Air Commodore Roger Topp AFC 2 bars

Commanded Royal Air Force Coltishall. Commandant of the Aircraft & Armament Experimental Establishment, Boscome Down. Commanding Officer and acrobatic team leader of No. 111 Squadron joined the R.A.F. in 1943 and learned to fly in Canada. When he returned, to England in 1944 there was a surplus of powered aircraft pilots so he transferred to the Glider Pilot Regiment. On March 2, 1945, he flew a Horsa glider carrying jeep, guns and troops in the airborne crossing of the Rhine. In 1947 he joined No.98 Squadron, flying Mosquitos in Germany, becoming a flight commander and instrument flying examiner for his Wing. He was awarded the Air Force Cross in 1950. In that year he took the course at the Empire Test Pilots School, and remained at Farnborough on the staff of the Royal Aircraft Establishment. He undertook flying tests of various experimental armament installations, including guided weapons and the new 30 mm. Aden gun, four of which formed the Hunters armament. He was a leading acrobatic demonstration pilot on the Canberra twin-jet bomber, flying before the Emperor of Ethiopia and the Shah of Persia during their visits to Britain. In 1954, with another pilot, Squadron Leader Topp shared the 100 hours intensive flight testing of the Comet jet air liner undertaken from Farnborough. He was awarded a Bar to the A.F.C. in 1955 and a second Bar in January 1958 for work with the acrobatic team.

Click for artwork signed by this pilot

 

 

CLEARANCE AVIATION ART

This Week's Clearance Aviation Art

Spitfire of 761 Training Squadron (attached to the Royal Navy) flies over the Forth Railway Bridge on the eve of World War Two, also shown is HMS Royal Oak departing Rosyth for the open sea.

Land, Sea and Air by Ivan Berryman.
£70.00
James Edgar (Johnnie) Johnson was the Royal Air Forces top fighter ace in Europe with 38 confirmed victories during the War. Johnson was called up in 1939 following his training with the RAF Volunteer Reserve. Having been hospitalized for much of the Battle of Britain, Johnsons first serious action was in mid-1941 when he often flew with Douglas Baders section. Johnson was promoted quickly and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross following his fifth victory in 1941. In early 1943 Johnson was put in command of a wing of the Royal Canadian Air Force. Flying the high-performance Supermarine Spitfire Mark IX, Johnson achieved 18 victories in seven months of flying. Many of Johnsons victories were achieved against the Messersmitt Bf-109. Promoted to Group Captain in early 1945, Johnson was put in command of the 125 Wing for the duration of the War. The Supermarine Spitfire is the only Allied fighter to have been continuously produced from before 1939 to after 1945. In total more than 22,000 of these splendid aircraft were built. The chief designer of the Spitfire was R.J. Mitchell, a brilliant engineer who joined the Supermarine company in 1916, and by 1920 was its chief engineer. Mitchell fashioned a number of high performance maritime aircraft, culminating with the sleek S series of float planes. This is the float plane which ultimately won permanent possession of the coveted Schneider Trophy for Britain, and established a new world speed record in excess of 400 MPH in 1931. In that same year the Air Ministry issued a specification for a new high-performance day/night fighter. Mitchells design, the Type 224, lost out in the competition to the Gloster Gladiator biplane. In 1936 the new Rolls Royce Merlin engine was fitted to a prototype 224, and the Spitfire was born. Achieving a speed of 396 MPH, the RAF was impressed, and initial orders for the first Spitfires were placed. Sadly, R.J. Mitchell succumbed to cancer in 1937 at the age of only 42. With the onset of the War, Spitfire production soared, and the aircraft was steadily improved. The Mark IX, as depicted in Stan Stokes painting entitled Canadian Heroes, first entered service in July 1942. The Mark IX was identifiable because of its four-bladed prop and its twin radiators. Introduced partially in response to Germanys introduction of the Focke Wolfe FW 190, the Mark IX was produced in greater numbers (5,665) than any other particular Spitfire model. As depicted in Stokes painting Johnnie Johnson has just attained another victory over a Bf-109 while flying with the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1944. The painting is dedicated to the many Canadians which served with the RAF during the War.
Canadian Heroes by Stan Stokes.
£40.00
When No 49 Squadron Lancasters bombed the S.S. barracks at Berchtesgaden on 25th April 1945, its aircrews completed a campaign that had begun 5 and a half years earlier in September, 1939. From the very beginning, 49 Squadron were in the thick of the action with one of their pilots, Roderick Learoyd, winning Bomber Commands first Victoria Cross. In 1942 it was Lancasters of 49 Squadron that led the epic raid on Schneider armament and locomotive works at Le Creusot. In 1943 they flew the shuttle-bombing raids to Friedrichshafen and Spezia, attacked the heavily defended rocket sites at Peenemunde, and in preparation for D-Day, bombarded the coastal batteries in Normandy and the V-1 sites in the caves by the river Loire, north of Paris. Later in 1944 the squadron notably took part in the raid on German Baltic Fleet, continuing to fly important bombing missions against the Nazi war machine until the final collapse of the Third Reich. So it was fitting that an RAF squadron whose history went right back to 1916, should make the coupe de grace at Berchtesgarden.  Northern Europes short summer nights, with darkness lasting but a few hours, often saw the RAF bomber crews returning to England at dawn, and it is one such scene which is caught up over the river Orwell at Pin Mill, Lancasters of No. 49 Squadron descend low over Suffolk, heading towards their base at Fiskerton. The night raid on Hamburg is almost completed. Spitfires from No. 129 Squadron, based at Hornchurch, having made an early morning attack on German installations in Holland, have picked up the bombers and escorted them home.
Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian.
£145.00
 Lynx Mk7 deplanes chalk, South Armagh.

Eagle Patrol by John Wynne Hopkins.
£60.00

  Having completed yet another sortie, the crew of 101 Sqn Special Operations Lancaster SR-W, piloted by Flt Lt Rusty Waughman, are about to commence the long and hazardous journey back to their base at Ludford Magna, Lincolnshire.
Heading Home by Philip West.
£75.00
 The balance of maritime power in the Mediterranean was transformed at a stroke by the British air attack which disabled three Italian battleships in a few minutes. The target was the core of Mussolinis fleet, tucked away in Taranto Harbour, in southern Italy. The attack, codenamed Operation Judgement, took place in bright moonlight by twenty-one Swordfish from the British carrier HMS Illustrious. In the confined space of the harbour, their torpedoes had a devastating impact, at least nine torpedoes struck their targets. In all, seven ships were severely damaged, including the battleship Caio Duilio (left), Littorio (right) and Conte Di Cavour.

Raid on Taranto by Anthony Saunders
£50.00
 Nobody, least of all Allied aircrew, ever doubted the tenacity of the Luftwaffe, more particularly that of the German fighter pilots. From the early encounters during the Battle of Britain to the greeat air battles in defence of their homeland late in the war, at all times they were held in high regard, even if resented as a foe. At no time was their dedication, determination, and courage better demonstrated than during the final stages of World War Two. By the summer of 1944 the Allies had gained a foothold in Normandy, and total air superiority above northern France. German installations and ground positions were being pounded daily from the air, and the Ruhr, the heartland of industrial Germany, was under constant siege. Even the factories in southern Germany were not safe from the attentions of the USAAF bombers by day, and the RAF by night. But in spite of the pressures of mounting losses and diminished supplies, the Luftwaffe fought doggedly on in best traditions of the fighter pilot. The morning of 19th July 1944 saw the USAAFs 8th and 15th Air Forces mount an attack of awesome proportion against the aircraft factories in the region of Munich. To combat a seemingly overwhelming force of 1400 bombers and almost as many fighter escorts, the Luftwaffe were able to put up just three Gruppen from JG300 and one from JG302, flying a mix of Me109Gs and Fw190s - barely 50 serviceable fighters between them. They were joined by a dozen Me109s of II./JG27, these fighters desperately trying to defend the very factories in which they were made.

Messerschmitt Country by Nicolas Trudgian
£120.00
 Almost every major invasion that took place in Europe in World War II began with para drops, and in almost every case the C-47 was the aircraft that delivered these elite fighting troops. Few C-47 pilots had more combat experience than Sid Harwell, seen flying his Dakota in this typical action scene, dropping airborne troops into occupied Europe soon after D-Day. No matter what resistance he encountered, the good C-47 pilot put his aircraft right over the Dropping Zone, every time.
Invasion Force by Nicolas Trudgian.
£40.00

FEATURED AIRCRAFT

Tiger

F-5

Click for artwork of this aircraft

LATEST AVIATION RELEASES

 Austrian-born Walter Nowotny was one of Germany's highest scoring aces of WWII with 258 victories to his credit, three of them flying the Messerschmitt Me.262. He is depicted here flying White 8 of Kommando Nowotny based at Achmer, Germany in 1944. He was killed in action later that year following a fraught combat with US fighters during the Defence of the Reich.

White 8 - Walter Nowotny by Ivan Berryman.
 The highest scoring fighter pilot of all time with a confirmed tally of 352 victories, Erich Hartmann is depicted getting airborne from a snowy airstrip in Czechoslovakia, late in 1944 in a Bf109G-6 of 6./JG 52.

Erich Hartmann - The Ace of Aces by Ivan Berryman.
 Arguably the best known of all World War 1 fighter aces, Mannfred von Richthofen, the 'Red Baron', is depicted here flying Fokker Dr.1, serial No 425/17, in its final livery following the introduction of the <i>Balkenkreuze</i>, early in 1918. Contrary to popular belief, this was the only Triplane flown by the <i>Rittmeister</i> that was painted all red and was also the aircraft in which he lost his life on 21st April 1918, the celebrated ace having scored a confirmed 80 victories against allied aircraft over France.

The Greatest of Them All - Manfred von Richthofen by Ivan Berryman.
 Perhaps the greatest exponent of Fokker's Eindecker series of aircraft, Max Immelmann is credited with 15 aerial victories and was the first fighter pilot ever to win the coveted Pour le Mérite. He was killed on 18th June 1916 during combat with British FE.2B fighters of 25 Sqn.

The First Ace - Max Immelmann by Ivan Berryman.

This Week's Half Price Offers

 A Mosquito Mk.BIX above the clouds in late 1943. Mosquito B.IX LR503 holds the record for the most combat missions flown by a single Allied bomber in the Second World War, serving 213 sorties.

A De Havilland Beauty by Ivan Berryman. (C)
Half Price! - £45.00
 Britain's highest scoring Typhoon ace, Wing Commander J R Baldwin climbs from the cockpit of his personalised Typhoon at a makeshift airfield in northern France after a sortie in support of the Allied forces' drive into mainland Europe following D-Day in June 1944.  Baldwin was instrumental in the capture of a German General's Mercedes, a prize which he employed as his personal transport for the duration of his time in France.

Wing Commander J R Baldwin - The Spoils of War by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 In response to a requirement for a seaplane fighter scout, Albatros developed the elegant W.4, a direct descendent of their successful D.1, incorporating many common parts with its land-based relative. About 120 of the type were constructed, many employed in the defence of important naval bases scattered along the coast of the North Sea. A small number of W.4s however fell into the hands of the Soviet Red Army in 1918 and were pressed into service on the Black Sea, based at Sevastopol, as depicted here.

Albatros W.4 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
The painting shows the three Lynx and three Gazelles from 4 Regiment ordered to assist the Queens Royal Irish Hussars attack objective PLATINUM.  Observing the left flank are two Gazelles, XX 395 commanded by Sgt Thompson and flown by Cpl Tween, and XZ 372 commanded by SSgt Daly, flown by Lt Tilley; with Lynx XZ 215, commanded by Capt Avery US Army and his pilot Sgt Isherwood, in support. In the foreground are Lynx XZ 199 commanded by Capt Morley and flown by SSgt Seymour, engaging Iraqi armour, and Lynx XZ 221, commanded by Sgt Maddison and flown by Cpl Long, engaging enemy MTLBs.  The aircraft destroyed four enemy tanks and six enemy personnel carriers without loss.  The attack was commanded by Major Eustace, from Gazelle XZ 338 flown by Sgt Church, and was the first ever use by the British Army of Lynx TOW missiled in combat.

4 Regiment in the attack, Operation DESERT STORM, Iraq, 26th February 1991. by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

 Wing Commander Brendan 'Paddy' Finucane is shown flying Spitfire Vb BM308 of No.154 Sqn based at Southend in 1942.

Tribute to Wing Commander Brendan 'Paddy' Finucane by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £75.00
 The night of the 16th May 1943 saw 19 modified Lancasters of the specially formed 617 squadron set out to breach the Ennepe, Eder, Mohne and Sorpe dams in Westphalia, Germany. The mission was led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson.

The Dambusters by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 With Italys entry into WW II on June 10, 1940, the epic two-and-one-half-year siege of Malta began. Symbolizing the defiant resistance of the people and defenders of that tiny island, the legend of Faith, Hope, and Charity grew from a handful of Gloster Sea Gladiators which initially comprised Maltas sole aerial defense. Until the arrival of the more modern Hawker Hurricanes, these obsolescent biplanes fought the Regia Aeronautica alone in the skies above Malta. Only six or seven Gladiators were assembled from the shipment of eighteen crated aircraft which had been delivered by the HMS Glorious. Others were utilized for spare parts, and three had been dispatched, still crated, to Egypt. Though hugely outnumbered, the defenders fought on, raising the morale of the citizens of Malta, and denying the Italians mastery of the sky. Suffering from a constant shortage of spare parts, tools and equipment, the devoted ground support crews were never able to keep more than three Gladiators operational at any point in time. Only one of these Gladiators was totally lost in aerial combat, and the sole surviving aircraft was presented to the people of Malta, and today stands in their National War Museum as a proud symbol of courage and endurance. In Stan Stokes painting, a Sea Gladiator, piloted by Flight Lt. James Pickering, tangles with a Fiat C.R. 42 over Malta in 1940 while an Italian Savoia S.79 tri-engined bomber passes by in the background. The Gloster Gladiator represented the zenith of development of the classic biplane fighter aircraft, a design formula which characterized an entire era from WW I until the advent of the monoplane fighter just before WW II. Glosters naval model of the Gladiator was equipped with a Bristol Mercury VIIIA engine providing a maximum speed of 253 MPH, a rate of climb of 2300 feet per minute, an operational ceiling of 32,200 feet, and a range of 415 miles. The Gladiator was armed with four .303 inch Browning machine guns, and incorporated several advanced features including an enclosed cockpit and wing flaps. One top RAF ace, Sqd. Ldr. Pattle, attained eleven victories flying the Gladiator. A total of 527 Gladiators were produced, and the aircraft served in twelve different countries. The Italians were overly persistent in their emphasis on biplane fighters, stemming from their successes with these highly maneuverable machines during the Spanish Civil War. Employing distinctive Warren-truss type interplane bracing the C.R. 42 was powered by a Fiat A74 R.C. 38 engine providing a maximum speed of 274 MPH and a range of 485 miles. The C.R. 42 was more lightly armed than the Gladiators it opposed, possessing only two 12.7mm Breda machine guns. The C.R 42 served on all of Italys fronts including North and East Africa, France, Britain, the Balkans, and Russia. Exported to Hungary, Sweden and Belgium, the C.R. 42 ironically served alongside the Gladiator in other theaters of operation during WW II.
Faith Hope and Charity by Stan Stokes. (C)
Half Price! - £65.00
 Tucked in tight en route to Copenhagen, a wave of Mosquito FB VIs of 21 Sqn and their Mustang Mk.III escorts of 126 Sqn (including top Ace Agorastos John Plagis - 16 victories, on his last mission of the war)  approach the Jutland Peninsula after a bumpy crossing of the North Sea on the morning of 21st March 1945.  The Mosquitoes went on to carry out one of the most daring and successful raids of the Second World War on the German Gestapo headquarters in the centre of Copenhagen, inflicting irreparable damage to the Shellhus and killing more than 150 Gestapo personnel.

Shell House Raiders by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 

TOP AIRCRAFT

Spitfire

The operational history of the Spitfire with the Royal Air Force started with the first Mark 1 Spitfire K9789, which entered service with 19th Squadron RAF at Duxford Airfield on 4th August 1938. The Spitfire achieved legendary status during the Battle of Britain, a reputation aided by the famous Spitfire Fund organised and run by Lord Beaverbrook at the Ministry of aircraft production. 
Although the key aim of Fighter Command was to stop the Luftwaffes bombers, in practice the tactic was to use Spitfires to counter German escort fighters, particularly the Bf109s, while the Hurricane squadrons attacked the bombers. Well known Spitfire pilots included Johnnie Johnson (34 enemy aircraft shot down), who flew the Spitfire right through his operational career from late 1940 to 1945, John Freeborn, Douglas Bader, Robert Standford-Tuck, Maurice Brown who flew Spitfires and Hurricanes during the major air battles of 1940. Some notable Commonwealth pilots were Canadian George Beurling with 31.33 victories, South African Pilot A G Sailor Malan with 27 victories and Alan Deere from New Zealand with 17 victories. The Spitfire continued to play increasingly diverse roles throughout the Second World War and beyond, often in air forces other than the RAF. The Spitfire, for example, became the first high-speed photo reconnaissance aircraft to be operated by the RAF. Sometimes unarmed, they flew at high, medium and low altitudes, often ranging far into enemy territory to closely observe the Axis powers and provide an almost continual flow of valuable intelligence information throughout the war. In 1941 and 1942, PRU Spitfires provided the first photographs of the Freya and Würzburg systems and, in 1943, helped confirm that the Germans were building the V1 and V2. In the Mediterranean the Spitfire blunted the attacks on Malta by the Italian Regia Aeronautica and German Luftwaffe and, from early 1943, helped pave the way for the Allied invasions of Sicily and Italy. On 7th March 1942, 15 Mk Vs carrying 90-gallon fuel tanks under their bellies took off from HMS Eagle off the coast of Algeria on a 600-mile flight to Malta. Those Spitfires were the first to see service outside Britain. During WWII, Spitfires were used by the USAAF in the 4th Fighter Squadron until replaced by P-47 Thunderbolts in March 1943.
Lancaster Me262 Spitfire Mustang
Hurricane Me109 Flying Fortress Fw190

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New Aviation Packs
Dambuster Crew Signed Art Prints.
The

The Dambusters by Gerald Coulson.
Dambusters

Dambusters - Moment of Truth by Ivan Berryman. (C)
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Jet Age Aviation Art Print Pack.
Victor

Victor by Keith Aspinall.
Testing

Testing Time by Keith Aspinall.
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Low Cost RAF Bomber Prints.
Breaking

Breaking the Silence by Keith Aspinall.
Climbing

Climbing Out by Keith Aspinall.
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Keith Woodcock Hurricane Art Print Pack.
Dawn

Dawn Scramble by Keith Woodcock.
The

The Last of the Many by Keith Woodcock.
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World War One Aviation Dogfight Art Prints.
Knights

Knights of the Sky by Nicolas Trudgian
Captain

Captain Roy Brown engages the Red Baron, 21st April 1918 by Ivan Berryman.
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Welcome to Aviation Prints .co.uk!  Use our drop down menus to find a particular aircraft, artist or signature, or click the links to the most popular in each category which we have provided above.  Browse through over 80 aviation artists, 120 different aircraft and well over 1500 aviation pilot and aircrew signatures.  Look out for our specially discounted two-print packs - especially designed for aviation art collectors, our packs bring together prints with the same aircraft, squadron, event or similar collectable signatures and offer large discounts off some of the latest releases and most popular prints.

At Aviation Prints .co.uk we hold 99% of the items advertised on our website in stock - our warehouse contains more stock than any other aviation art dealer, and we have over 1,000 print editions which are unavailable anywhere else.  We invest in aviation art by publishing artwork by a number of aviation artists ourselves - and we are also authorised distributors for other aviation art publishers, making our range of artwork the largest available.  With over 24 years of experience in the field of fine art, you can find the best deals around on aviation art at Aviation Prints .co.uk!

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